Skip to content
ANNOUNCING REPRESENTATION OF JENNA GRIBBON

ANNOUNCING REPRESENTATION OF JENNA GRIBBON

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce our representation of Jenna Gribbon. The artist's first solo exhibition with the gallery will be presented in Los Angeles in 2024. Read more about the artist in ARTnews.

Gribbon’s oil paintings constitute an important new entry in the long lineage of figurative art, extending its narrative possibilities to explore the act of looking. Her vivid portraits, frequently nudes or partial nudes, depict those closest to her, and sometimes the artist herself, in candid poses, during uncanny moments. Replete with saturated colors—and spotlit in awkward, uncomfortable, or humorous positions—the protagonists are often seen looking directly at the artist, blurring the line between observer and the observed. By including her own image in her paintings, whether it’s her legs brushed up against her partner’s or her dramatic shadow lurking in the foreground, Gribbon becomes both actor and director in an unfolding storyline that is equal parts comedic, tender, fantastical, and dark. She uses scale to decipher between true-to-life and constructed scenes. In her larger paintings, Gribbon employs strategically placed props––mirrors, blindfolds, clamp lights, colored gels, green screens––to explore different types of mediation that affect image consumption and investigate the power dynamics between subject, artist, and viewer. Her recent work most prominently features her partner, Mackenzie Scott, whose recurrence both personalizes and simultaneously establishes her as a kind of avatar; shifting the focus of the painting away from the figure and toward the way the figure is framed. Gribbon’s paintings often begin as a photo taken on her phone, forging a fluid relationship between photography and painting, the real and the surreal, and between the ephemerality of phone photography and the enduring quality of oil paint. By painting otherwise fleeting scenes, the artist adds texture, depth, and a sense of permanency to these temporal images, highlighting themes of pleasure, joy, and expanding the lexicon of queer iconography.

Jenna Gribbon (b. 1978, Knoxville, Tennessee) is currently the subject of a solo exhibition on view through February 19, 2023, at Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia, Italy. Recent group exhibitions include Living Histories: Queer Views and Old Masters, The Frick Collection, New York (2022); and I will wear you in my heart of heart, FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2021); and Paint, also known as Blood: Women, Affect and Desire in Contemporary Painting, Warsaw Museum of Modern Art, Poland (2019). Her work is in the permanent collections of institutions including the Kunstmuseum The Hague, the Netherlands; Brant Foundation, New York; Dallas Museum of Art; Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, Las Vegas, Nevada; New Orleans Museum of Art, Louisiana; Kurpfälzisches Museum, Heidelberg, Germany; Rubell Museum, Miami; and FLAG Art Foundation, New York. Gribbon lives and works in New York.

In collaboration with David Kordansky Gallery, Gribbon will continue to be represented by MASSIMODECARLO and LGDR.

OPENING THIS WEEK: BETTY WOODMAN @ OUR NEW YORK GALLERY

OPENING THIS WEEK: BETTY WOODMAN @ OUR NEW YORK GALLERY

In "A New Look at a Groundbreaking Ceramics Artist," a New York Times feature on Betty Woodman, Lissa McClure, Executive Director of the Woodman Family Foundation, says the artist's legacy is that "she broke through the confines of her medium. She wanted clay, ceramics, to go further than it had in millennia, to make it acceptable, to hybridize it, to combine ceramics with sculpture and painting."

On view October 29 through December 17, Betty Woodman: Conversations on the Shore, Works from the 1990s marks the first major presentation of Woodman's work in New York in six years. Join us for an opening reception from 6 to 8 PM on Friday, October 28. A walkthrough of the show led by Katarina Jerinic, Collections Curator at the Woodman Family Foundation, will take place on Tuesday, November 1 from 3 to 4 PM. A monograph documenting the exhibition will be published by David Kordansky Gallery next year.

The works on view include a number of wall-mounted and free-standing sculptures, each engaged in a range of conversations about materials, art history, function, architecture, sculpture, and painting. The presentation is anchored by Conversations on the Shore, a major installation featuring floor- and wall-mounted elements from 1994 that has not been exhibited since the late 1990s, when it appeared in a traveling solo show which originated at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. In the other objects from the 1990s—such as the diptych of vases, Still Life Vase #15 (1991), and the wall-based Balustrade Relief Vase sculptures—Woodman created increasingly complex juxtapositions of sculptural form and painterly glazing. This often meant bringing representational imagery of vessels, flowers, and plants into conversation with bold, geometric patterns, or dynamically combining vessel-like objects with glazed ceramic fragments that appeared to surround, animate, or emerge from them.

As Woodman continued to expand upon discoveries she made in installation and collaborative projects produced in the 1980s, which have been studied and shown alongside art associated with the Pattern and Decoration movement, she asked ever more probing questions about how space functioned both inside and outside of artworks. If she had long treated the lines between life and art—like those between history and the present, or sculpture and painting—as permeable divisions, in the 1990s her work began to embody that permeability more fully. It was during these years that her interest in rearticulating the formal achievements of modernist painters became fully embodied in objects that both acknowledged the wall and extended out from it; that revealed the possibilities of color when applied to three-dimensional form; and that examined how formalist ways of looking could not only enable people to become more sensitive to humor, curiosity, and pleasure, but to actively cultivate them throughout the cycles of everyday life.

ANNOUNCING MATTHEW BRANNON @ ART021

ANNOUNCING MATTHEW BRANNON @ ART021

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce a solo presentation of new silkscreen prints and paintings by Matthew Brannon at ART021 Shanghai Contemporary Art Fair. Visit us at Booth C04 at the fair from November 10 – 13.

Matthew Brannon is one of contemporary art’s most astute chroniclers of cultural movements and their associated signifiers. His unique silkscreen prints, paintings, and other works are the products of meticulous research and careful craft. They are also vivid personal fantasias in which recognizable forms interact with mysterious ones drawn from the depths of the collective imagination. For ART021, Brannon has trained his focus on the complex visual history of the 1980s, expanding on his longstanding interest in the transformations of the 1960s and 1970s to examine a new set of icons, milestones, and art historical resonances.

The presentation features both unique silkscreen prints and paintings. As a group, their saturated hues and multi-faceted allusions constitute an immersive look at the ways in which cinema, popular music, technology, and mass media underwent pointed changes during a decade that continues to inspire nostalgia, fear, and curiosity. Brannon’s compositions depict real-world objects and objects of fantasy as closely related manifestations of a common source of innovation, hysteria, and imagination. His works––as psychological as they are critical––pinpoint the places where fact and fiction uncomfortably intersect.

大卫·柯丹斯基画廊很荣幸地宣布将在ART021上海廿一当代艺术博览会上呈现马修·布兰农(Matthew Brannon)的新作个展。我们诚邀您在11月10日至13日展会期间莅临我们的C04展位。

马修·布兰农是当代艺术世界中最敏锐的记录者之一,其作品记录了文化运动及其相关的符号。他独特的丝网印刷、绘画和其他作品都是经由周密审慎的研究和精密制作的过程而产生。它们也是一支支生动的个人幻想曲,在其中,可识别的形式与来自集体想象之深处的神秘形式相互交织作用。在本次ART021展出的作品中,布兰农试图聚焦于1980年代复杂的视觉历史,延伸了其对于1960、1970年代视觉转型的长期兴趣,从而探索了一系列新的图符、重要事件及其在艺术史上的回响。

本次展览将呈现艺术家独特的丝网印刷和绘画作品。这些作品作为一个整体,其高饱和度的色彩和多面向的隐喻构成了一种身临其境式的观察,展现了电影、流行音乐、科技和大众媒体在这十年间所发生的剧烈变化,它们持续激发着人们无尽的怀旧之情、恐惧和好奇心。布兰农的作品将现实世界中的物体和幻想的物体紧密相连,揭示了它们同为创造力、疯狂和想象力之产物。他的作品——既是精神分析式的又是批判性的——指向了事实与虚构之间令人不适的交集之处。

ANNOUNCING MICHAEL WILLIAMS @ THE POWER STATION

ANNOUNCING MICHAEL WILLIAMS @ THE POWER STATION

Drawings, an exhibition of works on paper and drawings by Michael Williams, will open at The Power Station, Dallas, on October 21 and will be on view through March 11, 2023. The 250 works in the exhibition foreground Williams's drawing practice as an integral aspect of his approach to painting and to his negotiated relationship with cultural, critical, and personal observation.

For Williams, drawing is a tool for thinking. It encodes gesture with thought, where the two, like the pictures in each work, vibrate and interchange. There is much to be said about the calligraphic and choreographic, or the products of boredom and failure, in these works, but with each, Williams is able to make "necessary" the wayward potential of thinking and working as an act of drawing. "No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking," and, for Williams, drawing is the uninterrupted form of attention collected on paper.

ANNOUNCING RAUL GUERRERO @ ADAA: THE ART SHOW 2022

ANNOUNCING RAUL GUERRERO @ ADAA: THE ART SHOW 2022

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce a solo presentation of new paintings by Raul Guerrero at ADAA: The Art Show 2022. Visit us at Booth D28 at the fair from November 2 – 6.

For over four decades, Guerrero has made work informed by his experiences navigating cultures as an American of Mexican ancestry in Southern California. In his paintings, photographs, video, and performance works, Guerrero utilizes language and cultural signifiers to examine notions of place as a way to understand personal concepts of self.

The works featured in this presentation are a continued exploration of Guerrero’s iconic bar paintings, a series he began over two decades ago. Inspired by a biography of Spanish Mexican filmmaker Luis Buñuel, who often edited his film scripts in bars, Guerrero began depicting artist-frequented bars and taverns across Southern California. In this latest iteration of paintings, Guerrero expands his research to include historically significant establishments in New York, including King Cole Bar, The Oak Room at the Plaza, Fanelli Cafe, The Odeon, Bottino, and the Ear Inn. Guerrero’s paintings concretize the importance of these sites as places of assembly, reconciliation, inspiration, leisure, and refuge.

ANNOUNCING NEW EXHIBITIONS IN LOS ANGELES | JENNIFER GUIDI: IN THE HEART OF THE SUN

ANNOUNCING NEW EXHIBITIONS IN LOS ANGELES | JENNIFER GUIDI: IN THE HEART OF THE SUN

Jennifer Guidi brings meditative vision, methodical practice, and a nuanced perceptual understanding of light, color, and landscape to works that are as immersive as they are finely detailed. Radiating networks of small marks, saturated hues, and tactile surfaces—generated through Guidi’s use of sand—have become characteristic components of a vocabulary in which an expansive sense of scale exists in large and small works alike. In the Heart of the Sun features a group of painted bronze sculptures installed in a rock garden-like setting; new Universe Mandala and Sand Mandala paintings and focused works on paper in which experiments with color and pattern reveal an endlessly shifting array of moods and inner vistas. Throughout the exhibition, Guidi shows how each individual mark, gesture, composition, and artwork—indeed, each observable phenomenon in the natural world—is part of an encompassing totality that is always in the process of creating itself anew.

ANNOUNCING NEW EXHIBITIONS IN LOS ANGELES | SAM GILLIAM: WHITE AND BLACK PAINTINGS, 1975–1977

ANNOUNCING NEW EXHIBITIONS IN LOS ANGELES | SAM GILLIAM: WHITE AND BLACK PAINTINGS, 1975–1977

Sam Gilliam (1933–2022) is one of the great innovators in postwar American painting. Each stage of his six-decade career was characterized by a quest for reinvention, formal and material experimentation, and a desire to renew his audience’s—and his own—understanding of what painting could become. White and Black Paintings, 1975–1977 brings together important works from a period when Gilliam experimented with color, texture, scale, and materiality in wholly new ways.


Beginning with the White paintings, Gilliam built up sculptural, all-over surfaces dominated by layers of white paint made viscerally frenetic through the incorporation of hardening mediums that give them a palpable presence. Other colors that emerge from behind and around these encrusted white veils engage in a limitless play of dark and light, introducing complex, shifting moods in these decidedly non-monochromatic images. He also continued his use of beveled-edge stretchers; previous beveled-edge works foregrounded juxtapositions of prismatic color and dynamic sculptural form. In the White and Black paintings, the stretchers further emphasize the architectural solidity of Gilliam’s approach to pigment and medium, and firmly root the works in the spaces where they are installed.


The White and Black paintings are characterized by marks made with everyday tools; among them are shag rug rakes that Gilliam first employed during this period and continued to use in subsequent bodies of work throughout the next five decades. The rake allowed him to introduce both energetic linearity and textural relief and, as seen especially in the Black paintings, to highlight the geological feel of the paints he was mixing. Through these works, Gilliam continued to envision how painting could be a fully encompassing experience, transforming the relationship between the hand and the gestural mark into one between the painter’s entire body and the complete range of their materials.

ANNOUNCING DEANA LAWSON @ HIGH MUSEUM OF ART

ANNOUNCING DEANA LAWSON @ HIGH MUSEUM OF ART

Deana Lawson, the first museum survey dedicated to the artist’s work, will open at High Museum of Art in Atlanta, on October 7, 2022, and will be on view through February 19, 2023. Through a selection of more than 50 works from 2004 to the present, Deana Lawson features the full range of the artist’s career to date and establishes a narrative arc of her expansive vision for the first time. The survey debuted at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston in 2021 and traveled to MoMA PS1 earlier this year.

Deana Lawson is co-organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and MoMA PS1, Queens, New York, and is curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, ICA/Boston, and Peter Eleey, Curator-at-Large, UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing and Shanghai, with Anni Pullagura, Curatorial Assistant, ICA/Boston. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue.

ANNOUNCING FRED EVERSLEY @ ORANGE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

ANNOUNCING FRED EVERSLEY @ ORANGE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

Fred Eversley: Reflecting Back (the World), a survey exhibition by the artist, will open at the Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) in Costa Mesa, California, on October 8, 2022, and will be on view through January 15, 2023. Read more about Eversley in a major feature in The New York Times.

This exhibition expands on the groundbreaking 1976 exhibition of Eversley’s work at OCMA, formerly known as the Newport Harbor Art Museum. This year was a pivotal period for Eversley—he hit his stride with his primary mode of working at the same time the Light and Space movement gained momentum in Southern California. However, unlike his Light and Space peers who often relied on scientists and outsourced labor for the fabrication of their work, Eversley, as a trained engineer, had a technical understanding that enabled him to invent his own spin casting techniques and utilize polyester resin, industrial dyes, and pigments in pioneering ways—realizing his scientific energy concepts by movement and gravitational forces.

With a black parabolic lens created by Eversley in 1976 from OCMA’s collection as its springboard, Fred Eversley: Reflecting Back (the World) follows the logic of the black hole—the most luminous space in the universe—and takes the audience on a journey through time, space, and color where Eversley’s new cylindrical lens acts as a central anchoring axis. The exhibition was initiated by Cassandra Coblentz, OCMA’s former Senior Curator, and curated by Courtenay Finn, OCMA’s Chief Curator.

ALSO ON VIEW AT THE ORANGE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

Raul Guerrero included in
California Biennial 2022: Pacific Gold, curated by Elizabeth Armstrong, Essence Harden, and Gilbert Vicario
October 8, 2022 – February 26, 2023

Lucy Bull and Hilary Pecis included in
13 Women, curated by Heidi Zuckerman
October 8, 2022 – August 20, 2023

ANNOUNCING SHAHRYAR NASHAT @ ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

ANNOUNCING SHAHRYAR NASHAT @ ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

Raw Is the Red, a solo exhibition by Shahryar Nashat, will open at the Art Institute of Chicago on October 6, 2022, and will be on view through September 11, 2023. Nashat creates work that investigates the body and its image as sites of desire, fragmentation, tenderness, and resilience. Focusing on our physical limits and the possibilities of extension, Nashat treats digital and analog technologies—from LEDs to stone and cast resin—as prostheses, props, or stand-ins. For Raw Is the Red, the artist presents a newly commissioned sculpture alongside a vitrine-encapsulated "meat object." On Thursday, October 6, from 6 – 7 PM CT, join Nashat for a conversation on the artist's exhibition with Jordan Carter, curator at Dia Art Foundation, and Susanne Ghez, adjunct curator in Modern and Contemporary Art at the Art Institute of Chicago. To learn more about the event, please click here.

Raw Is the Red foregrounds the tensions between the human and the prosthetic, the interior and the exterior, the authentic and the drag. Coating the windows in pink film—a medium the artist frequently uses—Nashat expands the scenography to encompass the artwork’s architectural frame, enveloping viewers and queering their perception of the horizon.

The exhibition is curated by Jordan Carter, curator at Dia Art Foundation, and Susanne Ghez, adjunct curator in Modern and Contemporary Art at the Art Institute of Chicago.